Book Review: The Complete Guide to Vegan Food Substitutions

July 24, 2014

Even in the twenty-first century, it can be difficult to be a vegan. Most restaurants are still way behind the times when it comes to menu options. People still look at you funny and wonder how you can possibly survive without all the wonderful and artery-clogging options out there. It is at times like those that I am so happy to have a book like The Complete Guide to Vegan Food Substitutions, by Celine Steen and Joni Marie Newman. When I first saw the book, I didn’t think I needed it. After all–I have been a vegan since 2003, and I was vegetarian for a long time before that. I knew all about substitutions–or at least I thought I did. No how much you think you know, if you are a vegan, cook for vegans, or simply want to include some healthier options in your diet, this is a great cookbook to have in your arsenal.

The book is helpfully divided into color-coded sections: Dairy (including cheese), Eggs, Meat, Animal By-Products (honey and gelatin), Gluten, Soy, Refined Sugar, and Fat. At the end is a comprehensive chart covering everything. There are the substitutions, but there are also recipes using those substitutions. The authors also indicate what ready-made substitutions can be found at the store–and when it is easier to buy rather than make.

The first recipe I made was the Basic Soymilk Mayo, which is in the Egg section. There are actually two mayo recipes, that one and another using tofu. The soymilk mayo has two variations, one that involves cooking, and one that doesn’t. I haven’t made the tofu recipe or the cooked soymilk one, but the no-cook version is worth the cost of the book. I really don’t think I will ever need to buy pre-made vegan mayo ever again. It is really easy and really good–it actually has an “eggy” taste. I use Light Silk Soymilk (or the store brand equivalent), and it still comes out thick and rich. I use it for cole slaw, pasta salads, vegan tuna/chicken salads, and as a condiment on sandwiches.

Another recipe from this section that I made was the Chick-o-late Brownie Cake, where chickpeas are the substitute for the egg. I made the gluten-free version, and it was really good. You would never know there is a can of chickpeas in there.

From the Dairy section, I have tried the White/Milk Chocolate Bar and the Chocolate Pudding. As a vegan, white chocolate is difficult to find, so I thought this recipe would be the solution. Raw cacao butter is on the expensive side, but I did get a big enough package to make each recipe once–and I have enough to make the milk chocolate again. I wasn’t able to find vanilla powder, so I used vanilla extract, and I didn’t purchase the optional soy lecithin. Still, the end result was pretty good. I used some candy molds I had, but an ever better use for them would probably be in baked goods.

IMG_1217

Kitty-themed White Chocolate

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White Chocolate Flowers

 

The Chocolate Pudding was also quite good. I used Silk’s Light Chocolate Soymilk, and I am often concerned that the light won’t thicken well, but no issues! Some of the pudding was used to make the Walnut Chocolate Brownies in the Egg section, and they got raves from my daughter!

From the Meat section, I made the Taco Meat, and that runs a close second to the mayo for a recipe that, on its own, is worth buying the book for. The recipe has a gluten-free version that uses TVP, which is the one I made, and a soy-free version using wheat gluten. It was so good–and so easy! You don’t even need taco seasoning, because all the spices are right there in the recipe.

Further in the chapter is a recipe for Pizza Pepperoni Topping with the same gluten-free and soy-free options. It was OK, but I blame the fact that my liquid smoke is really old, and not the recipe, for it not being perfect. I used to love pepperoni, but the vegan options at the store have too much gluten for me, so this was nice to have on my pizza! I also tried the Bacon Bit recipe, but it came out a little watery. Next time, I will try less water or a longer baking time. Might also add a bit more salt.

The Gluten chapter opens with an All-Purpose Baking Mix, and it is used in some of the recipes. I also tried it in some other recipes, and the resulting products had really nice crumb and texture, better than I’ve gotten with other a-p flour substitutions. I made the Chocolate Chip Muffins, which called for the baking mix, the Provençal Socca, the Superfudgy Coconut Cookie Bars, and the Coconut Cinnamon Raisin Bread. All were really good. Socca is a flatbread that is cooked in a skillet like a crepe. We had them plain–the recipe includes ideas for toppings–and they were really tasty.

Provensal Socca

Provençal Socca

There are a few sections I haven’t tried yet, but I have seen a lot of testy-sounding recipes that I am excited to make. And I recently read on Facebook that they are working on a second volume. When that one comes out, I won’t be hesitating!

 

 

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Kim Harrison

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